Drones in the Construction Industry

December 1st, 2020 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

To the layman, drones may seem like the newest entertainment indulgence for kids or a novel way to expand your photography hobby. However, due to unparalleled surveillance capability, drone use has exploded in the construction industry with a trending growth of over 200% per year, as reported by DroneDeploy. The uses of drone technology in construction are numerous, varied, and continuing to expand, from aerial land surveying to safety monitoring and data collection.

Land Surveying and Mapping

Drones are capable of mapping vast expanses of land more quickly, efficiently, and economically than traditional methods. While useful, standard topographical maps can become quickly outdated. Drones provide information in real-time with the added advantage of producing high-resolution images capable of being manipulated into 3D models. From producing rapid information on the terrain’s suitability to identifying possible project challenges, drones are invaluable in making sure a project stays within budget and on schedule.

Project Surveillance

Drones enable contractors and building managers to quickly and easily keep tabs on every aspect of their project and stay apprised of every aspect of site activity and progress. This data can instantly be put to use to avoid costly problems that can affect the completion of the project.

Safety and Security

A major benefit of drone use on construction sites is the sharp increase in worker safety by providing visual data of potential work hazards, which can then be remedied. In many cases, drones record necessary data in situations where manual collection of information would place construction workers in dangerous or risky situations that could result in a fall.

Drones are unmatched in their ability to provide security surveillance. Many construction companies have begun implementing a 24-hour drone surveillance program to identify unauthorized personnel and protect the project and expensive equipment from vandalism and theft.

Communication

Communication is a key element in any project. Drone technology now provides instant, visual, and continuous connectivity among managers, construction workers, engineers, and design teams. In addition, drones are instrumental in improving client co munication by offering impressive aerial views of the project’s progress.

SCAFFOLD SAFETY TIPS

November 1st, 2020 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

Working on raised scaffolding must be taken seriously, as it can prove dangerous or even deadly if proper safety precautions are not followed. However, if safety protocols and practices are adhered to, these structures can be just as safe as working any other elevated construction method. Let’s have a look at some of the most important scaffolding safety tips.

Get the Right Training

New safety regulations mandate that all workers who will be working on or near scaffolding be properly trained on scaffolding construction and safe usage. This includes how to get on and off the scaffolding safely, how to prevent falls, and how to respond to emergency situations while on the scaffolding. This type of training is necessary to keep not only yourself, but the everyone else on and below the scaffolding secure and safe.

Inspect Regularly

Always inspect scaffolding thoroughly at the beginning of the day, after breaks, and at the end of the day. Check to see that the base is secured, and that it is level and adjusted for any lean in the building. Make sure that every single guardrail and plank is installed or fitted safely and securely. Look for elevation changes and obstructions (such as wires), and check weather conditions.

Understanding Load Capacity

During the design stage of scaffolding, a common and dangerous mistake is failing to consider the full load the structure will be required to carry. For safety’s sake, do not add workers beyond the scaffold’s rated capacity. Also, watch that equipment does not overload the structure, and ensure that nothing is pushing against any guardrails.

Secure the Platform

Scaffolding is designed to be braced by, or entirely attached to, a building. If bracing is not adequately secured, scaffold movement may dislodge an end, which will reduce the stability of the scaffold. There are several types of scaffolding brace retention or locking systems. These systems need to operate freely during assembly and dismantling, and must also secure or lock to prevent the brace from dislodging. Never replace the brace parts supplied by the manufacturer with nails or other miscellaneous substitutions.

Take Advantage of Guardrails

A construction company must assure that any scaffolding over 10 feet high has guardrails on the three sides facing away from the building at minimum, and it is recommended that guardrails be installed on the building side as well. Guardrails are not a substitute for proper fall protection gear, which should be worn at all times while on the scaffolding.

Inspect It

Scaffolding structures must be constantly inspected and maintained to ensure their structural integrity and safety. An experienced inspector will check to see that all boards are intact, and that all components are safety compliant. Failure to keep these crucial components regularly maintained could lead to extremely hazardous conditions.

Keep Things Organized

Scaffolding structures are notoriously cramped, so it is essential to keep tools organized and out of the way. Remember to keep all walkways free of obstructions and trash that might cause a fall.

Balance Yourself

Scaffolding must be perfectly level to minimize the fall risk. Still, stay alert when on a scaffold, and always watch your balance to avoid falls and serious injury.

Use Protection, or PPE

PPE (personal protective equipment) such as head protection, fall prevention gear, and non-slip footwear should be worn at all times to minimize the risk of injury to yourself, your co-workers, and others in your immediate area.

Construction Safety Tips for Fall Protection

October 1st, 2020 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

For these safety tips, we focused on OSHA’s Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards in Construction. For each standard cited we have a brief explanation of the standard or hazard along with some general tips for workers to keep in mind in order to assure a safe work environment.

FALL PROTECTION

1. Subpart M – Fall Protection – 1926.501 Duty to Have Fall Protection.
Number of Citations Issued in FY2019: 7,085

Duty to have fall protection is the most cited standard in the construction industry since falls are one of the leading causes of worker deaths in construction. Employers need to do a better job of assessing job sites and implementing fall protection systems to protect workers.

Workers: Workers should familiarize themselves with all potential fall hazards on a job site. Never work in an area where fall protection systems have yet to be installed. Workers using personal fall arrest systems should inspect them before each use to ensure they are working properly and are free of damage. The lanyard or lifeline should be short enough to prevent the worker from making contact with a lower level in the event of a fall. This means considering the length of the lanyard, length of dynamic elongation due to elastic stretch and the height of the worker.

2. Subpart L – Scaffolds – 1926.451 General Requirements.
Number of Citations Issued in FY2019: 3,320

Approximately 65% of all construction workers perform work on scaffolds. Employees performing work on and around scaffolding are exposed to falls, electrocutions and falling object hazards.

Workers: Hard hats should be worn when working on, under, or around a scaffold. Workers should also wear sturdy, non-skid work boots and use tool lanyards when working on scaffolds to prevent slips and falls and to protect workers below. Workers should never work on scaffolding covered in ice, water, or mud. Workers are prohibited from using boxes, ladders, or other objects to increase their working height when on a scaffold. Workers should never exceed the maximum load when working on scaffolds. Never leave tools, equipment, or materials on the scaffold at the end of a shift. Workers should not climb scaffolding anywhere except for the access points designed for reaching the working platform. Tools and materials should be hoisted to the working platform once the worker has climbed the scaffold. If personal fall arrest systems are required for the scaffold you will be working on, thoroughly inspect the equipment for damage and wear. Workers should anchor the system to a safe point that won’t allow them to free fall more than six feet before stopping.

3. Subpart X – Stairways and Ladders – 1926.1053 Ladders.
Number of Citations Issued in FY2019: 2,851

Improper ladder use is one of the leading causes of falls for construction workers resulting in injury or death. Reasons for ladder falls include incorrect ladder choice, failure to properly secure the ladder, and attempting to carry tools and materials by hand while climbing.

Workers: Always maintain three points of contact while ascending and descending a ladder, that’s both feet and at least one hand. Portable ladders should be long enough to be placed at a stable angle extended three feet above the work surface. Workers should tie ladders to a secure point at the top and bottom to avoid sliding or falling. Tools and materials should be carried up using a tool belt or a rope to pull things up once they’ve stopped climbing. Never load ladders beyond their rated capacity, including the weight of the worker, materials and tools.

Safety is always top priority in your work environment.

Tips for Contractors on the Rise of the COVID-19 Crisis

September 1st, 2020 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

At the start of 2020, the construction industry’s outlook had never been brighter. The early momentum of the United States economy served to boost the confidence of construction industry leaders. According to the Associated Builders and Contractors in mid-March, 72% of contractors expected to expand their staffing levels over the following six months, while more than 68% expected their sales levels to increase. Unfortunately, these expectations have halted because of the coronavirus outbreak.

The COVID-19 crisis has impacted construction projects worldwide in several ways, with numerous projects grinding to a halt. However, not all construction businesses have ceased operations for the time being. Several states in the U.S. have declared construction work as essential, and therefore will continue operations albeit in a limited capacity. Unfortunately, supply chain disruptions and a skeletal workforce are forcing project delays and stoppage.

The pandemic situation is continuously evolving. Many construction business owners have introduced several changes in their operations to adapt to the difficult circumstances. The implementation of social distancing, additional health and hygiene facilities, and remote work is essential to slowing down the spread of the virus.

As you deal with the impact of the coronavirus crisis on your operations, remember to do so with the mindset that you’re preparing for the recovery of your business. Here are some tips on how contractors can rise from the onslaught of COVID-19.

Evaluate Operational Risks and Short-Term Liquidity

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, your company will experience significant delays and disruptions due to the slowing down of the supply chain as well as the general shortage of labor.

At this point, you will need to assess your financial and operational risks and their impact on your overall margins. Because of the disruptions, you may be unable to fulfill your own obligations, so be proactive in renegotiating the terms of your contract if necessary. You should also consider alternative supply chain options, especially if your suppliers reside in areas that are severely impacted by the pandemic. If you source your materials overseas, especially in Asia, you may have to look for other options locally.

Many of the steps you need to take to counteract the impact of the crisis involve cash. For this reason, you need to assess your short-term liquidity and strictly monitor your cash flow. In particular, you need to focus on the management of your inventory (prolonged storage will incur proportional carry costs), as well as the collection of your pending receivables. If you’ve been diligent in filing your preliminary notices, you will have a better chance of collecting your invoices to support your COVID-19 crisis recovery.

Process

Contracts are the most powerful tool in a contractor’s arsenal, but only if they are done properly. The COVID-19 crisis has made the importance of every provision quite apparent. Unforeseen circumstances (force majeure) provisions, which are generally regarded as boilerplate clauses, have been at the forefront of discussions as many construction businesses have failed to fulfill obligations due to the pandemic. Depending on the language of a contract, these provisions can provide you with relief and more time to complete the job, or in some cases, void the contract altogether. Moving forward, this is a perfect opportunity for you to review your contract creation process and begin to negotiate contracts that address situations similar to this pandemic.

Prioritize Your Employees’ Safety

Construction business owners have always dealt with safety hazards on sites, but the pandemic is a completely different type of challenge. Understandably, there will be doubts among your employees about workplace safety that could affect their productivity.

Transitioning to the new normal is a challenge not just for you but for your employees as well. Your job is to explore any opportunities that can ease this transition. For instance, you can expand your work arrangements for non-field employees to include flexible options such as remote work. For field employees, you need to put measures in place to fight against infections, such as having more hygiene facilities and ensuring that social distancing protocols are followed. You may also need to revisit your employee leave policies and encourage workers with mild symptoms to take time off.

There’s no denying that the COVID-19 crisis has brought the global economy to its knees. No one knows when the pandemic will end and how businesses will recover. But if there’s anything that we have learned from previous economic crises, the construction industry is resilient. It may recover slowly, but it will always recover.

Tips for Contractors on the Rise of the COVID-19 Crisis

September 1st, 2020 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

At the start of 2020, the construction industry’s outlook had never been brighter. The early momentum of the United States economy served to boost the confidence of construction industry leaders. According to the Associated Builders and Contractors in mid-March, 72% of contractors expected to expand their staffing levels over the following six months, while more than 68% expected their sales levels to increase. Unfortunately, these expectations have halted because of the coronavirus outbreak.

The COVID-19 crisis has impacted construction projects worldwide in several ways, with numerous projects grinding to a halt. However, not all construction businesses have ceased operations for the time being. Several states in the U.S. have declared construction work as essential, and therefore will continue operations albeit in a limited capacity. Unfortunately, supply chain disruptions and a skeletal workforce are forcing project delays and stoppage.

The pandemic situation is continuously evolving. Many construction business owners have introduced several changes in their operations to adapt to the difficult circumstances. The implementation of social distancing, additional health and hygiene facilities, and remote work is essential to slowing down the spread of the virus.

As you deal with the impact of the coronavirus crisis on your operations, remember to do so with the mindset that you’re preparing for the recovery of your business. Here are some tips on how contractors can rise from the onslaught of COVID-19.

Evaluate Operational Risks and Short-Term Liquidity

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, your company will experience significant delays and disruptions due to the slowing down of the supply chain as well as the general shortage of labor.

At this point, you will need to assess your financial and operational risks and their impact on your overall margins. Because of the disruptions, you may be unable to fulfill your own obligations, so be proactive in renegotiating the terms of your contract if necessary. You should also consider alternative supply chain options, especially if your suppliers reside in areas that are severely impacted by the pandemic. If you source your materials overseas, especially in Asia, you may have to look for other options locally.

Many of the steps you need to take to counteract the impact of the crisis involve cash. For this reason, you need to assess your short-term liquidity and strictly monitor your cash flow. In particular, you need to focus on the management of your inventory (prolonged storage will incur proportional carry costs), as well as the collection of your pending receivables. If you’ve been diligent in filing your preliminary notices, you will have a better chance of collecting your invoices to support your COVID-19 crisis recovery.

Process

Contracts are the most powerful tool in a contractor’s arsenal, but only if they are done properly. The COVID-19 crisis has made the importance of every provision quite apparent. Unforeseen circumstances (force majeure) provisions, which are generally regarded as boilerplate clauses, have been at the forefront of discussions as many construction businesses have failed to fulfill obligations due to the pandemic. Depending on the language of a contract, these provisions can provide you with relief and more time to complete the job, or in some cases, void the contract altogether. Moving forward, this is a perfect opportunity for you to review your contract creation process and begin to negotiate contracts that address situations similar to this pandemic.

Prioritize Your Employees’ Safety

Construction business owners have always dealt with safety hazards on sites, but the pandemic is a completely different type of challenge. Understandably, there will be doubts among your employees about workplace safety that could affect their productivity.

Transitioning to the new normal is a challenge not just for you but for your employees as well. Your job is to explore any opportunities that can ease this transition. For instance, you can expand your work arrangements for non-field employees to include flexible options such as remote work. For field employees, you need to put measures in place to fight against infections, such as having more hygiene facilities and ensuring that social distancing protocols are followed. You may also need to revisit your employee leave policies and encourage workers with mild symptoms to take time off.

There’s no denying that the COVID-19 crisis has brought the global economy to its knees. No one knows when the pandemic will end and how businesses will recover. But if there’s anything that we have learned from previous economic crises, the construction industry is resilient. It may recover slowly, but it will always recover.

Worksite Hazards of Dehydration and Heat-Related Illnesses

August 1st, 2020 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

A major challenge for employers and managers is keeping their industrial site workers properly hydrated during hot summer months. Soaring temperatures along with layers of required PPE equipment can create hazardous, even fatal conditions for workers. Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are very real potential dangers. Beyond its direct health impact, however, dehydration can also cause additional workplace hazards by compromising workers’ ability to focus and function, elevating the risk of accidents and injury.

Warning Signs of Dehydration

In the interests of safety, managers are strongly advised to become familiar with the warning signs of dehydration. In addition, workers should be instructed on how to spot dehydration and encouraged to keep a careful watch on co-workers. Those most at risk are individuals working in direct sun for long hours while wearing personal protection equipment layers.

According to OSHA, these are the common physical signs of dehydration.

  • Extreme thirst
  • Cool, clammy skin
  • Goosebumps or chills
  • No longer perspiring
  • Darkly colored urine
  • Excessive fatigue
  • Sunken eyes
  • Red face
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Dry mouth

Preventing Worksite Dehydration

It makes sense for managers to have procedures in place to protect workers from dehydration in extreme heat. A good first step is instituting frequent breaks under shade or in a cool shelter to allow workers to reduce their body temperature.

Workers should be encouraged to drink water approximately every fifteen minutes at the rate of one quart (4 cups) per hour to replace lost fluids. Water is the best beverage choice, as coffee and soft drinks containing caffeine will deplete electrolytes more quickly and worsen dehydration.

At the End of the Workday

Workers should be reminded that when they return home after a long day in the heat, it is important to check their urine color. Dark yellow urine indicates dehydration, requiring the individual to keep drinking water until they pass clear urine.

CALIFORNIA HIGH-SPEED RAIL PROVIDES 4,000 CONSTRUCTION JOBS

July 1st, 2020 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

The Covid-19 pandemic has caused a flurry of uncertainty in the California construction industry. Questions have arisen as to whether a project is considered essential, as well as whether a full workforce can be safely maintained.

Amid this crisis, The California High-Speed Rail Authority has continued construction, creating more than 4,000 construction jobs over 119 miles of the high-speed rail project. This has greatly contributed to the local economy as well as helping to support a more stable state economy. This is California’s, and the nation’s, first high-speed rail system. It is currently the biggest infrastructure project in the state – possibly in the country.

The Authority has worked closely with the local trade unions, the State Building and Construction Trades Council and the Fresno Regional Workforce Development Board. With so many out of work, the carpenters, electricians, laborers, ironworkers, operating engineers, and many others on the project feel fortunate to have regular paychecks and steady jobs near home.

The majority of workers are from counties in the Central Valley. Of the 4,000 workers currently on the project, 62 live in Merced County, 223 live in Madera County, 1,969 live in Fresno County, 121 live in Kings County, 395 live in Tulare County, and 572 live in Kern County.

The Authority has operated under the mandate that jobs created by the high-speed rail project must benefit disadvantaged areas through the execution of a Community Benefits Agreement. The 119-mile construction site contains thousands of workers and hundreds of apprentices. According to the Targeted Worker Program included in the Community Benefits Agreement, 30% of all project work hours need to be performed by individuals from disadvantaged communities where annual household incomes range from $32,000 to $40,000.

This critically needed high-speed train will provide a clean, fast mode of mass transit, helping to alleviate the congestion on California’s highways, freeways, and airports. The completed project will contribute significantly to California’s economy, and serve the state’s growing population, while at the same time protecting the environment.

Prepare for Tomorrow – COVID-19 and the Construction Job Outlook

June 1st, 2020 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the novel coronavirus virus (COVID-19) has been detected in more than 160 locations internationally, including in the United States. As anyone with a computer or television knows, the number of cases involving person-to-person transmission outside China has been increasing at such a steady rate that the World Health Organization has recently declared the outbreak a pandemic. Each day, the number of confirmed infections rises exponentially. Quite simply, all industries, including retail, hospitality, manufacturing, finance and professional services are suffering and will continue to suffer disruptions not seen in our lifetimes.

Even prior to the pandemic the industry had already been plagued by an aging and ever dwindling skilled labor pool. Construction workers – aging out of the workforce. The average age in construction was 40.4 years in 2008 up four years from 1985. Construction workers overall stop working at an earlier age than other workers. These demographics predict an exodus of experienced workers from the industry in the next decade. In states where there are specific licensing requirements for specialty trades, it is even harder. In an already tightening construction labor market, any further and widespread disruption will have a major impact.

According to a report from the Brookings Institution nearly 3 million infrastructure workers are expected to retire or permanently leave their jobs in the next decade. An aging workforce combined with a lack of visibility, flexible training, or a pipeline of young talent has hit a crisis point, especially for smaller and rural communities where operations are under threat.

The combination of a decreasing pool of skilled workers due to retirements and increasing demand of construction and infrastructure, repair, and development provide the conditions which create opportunity for secure, well-paying careers for young people.

As the economy ramps up in a post-COVID-19 rebuilding, the greatest shortages will occur among skilled construction workers. In a job market likely flooded with unemployed, those people with demonstrable skills will stand out for the better paying positions. For people working in the fields, the key will be the ability to demonstrate skills. Certification offers a clear proof of skills that provides access to the best jobs.

In a state with a massive housing shortage, workers looking ahead and preparing for careers that will flourish in a post-COVID-19, construction trades offer a clear choice.

Construction Safety and Covid-19 in Los Angeles

May 1st, 2020 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

Under the California state and local orders, construction is considered an essential occupation and workers are allowed to continue to work during the pandemic. While that may sound like good news, the flip side is that construction workers are at greater risk on the job than those who are laid off, furloughed, or working from home.

Eric Garcetti, the Los Angeles Mayor, has issued detailed orders regarding steps to ensure the health of construction workers during this time. This order provides detailed requirements of construction companies to protect their workers from infection and provides compliance reviews and penalties for failure to implement the standards.

The order, as revised on April 15th , provides 19 standards each company must meet in order to continue to work. Many workers, speaking anonymously, report that the reality on construction sites is that these rules are impossible to implement even by construction supervisors who attempt to do so.

The flow of workers, deliveries, and multi-person tasks compromise the social distancing standard. Staggered arrival and departure schedules are difficult to implement. Disinfecting tools and surfaces is unrealistic as a full safety measure.

A local NBC affiliate filed a report of observations of a number of construction sites and found that social distancing was not observed at any of them. At the SoFi Stadium construction site, two cases of Covid-19 were identified as the 3,000 workers continued work on the “essential site.”

While the order by Mayor Garcetti is an attempt to provide safe working conditions for construction workers caught between the need to work and unemployment, the reality is that workers remain at risk without effective testing protocols.

Workers in the construction industry deserve the same protection as workers in other industries whose functions place them at risk of exposure.

Construction Workers Essential To COVID-19 Fight in California

April 1st, 2020 Posted by Uncategorized No Comment yet

At a time when all but essential workers are instructed to stay home, California is recognizing the critical role played by the construction workers. Whether it is housing for the homeless, homes for low income families, home construction to relieve the massive housing shortage in the state, or emergency retooling of hotels and schools to provide hospital services, California has allowed construction workers to continue to assist in solving the state’s most urgent problems.

Nathan Click, spokesperson for the Governor’s Office, noted in an email that the order applies to all workers “except as needed to maintain continuity of operation of the federal critical infrastructure sectors, critical government services, schools, childcare, and construction, including housing construction.” As one official said, “You can’t shelter in place if you have no shelter. In addition to construction projects, the state has recognized as essential those workers who keep buildings functional from hospitals to police stations, nursing homes, and correctional facilities.”

The preparations for an onslaught of coronavirus hospital emergency admission will require a vast number of construction workers to move to these most urgent new projects. As the state moves to acquire hotels, schools and other buildings which can be used as hospitals, there is a sudden surge in the need for skilled workers in every trade. The Governor’s Office also recognized the possibility that trade workers might be essential to conversion of manufacturing facilities to turn out critically needed items for medical care. Union officials noted that construction workers generally work at some distance from each other and much of their work is done in none other than confined spaces. However, the union is instructing workers to take breaks at a social distance of more than six feet, bring their food with them and not to congregate. They have also been instructed to avoid contact with others to reduce risk to themselves and the community. Stay informed and get more information on this trade at Creed LA.

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