Posts in Architecture

NASA’s Ames Sustainability Base: The Future of Federal Construction

February 11th, 2019 Posted by Architecture No Comment yet

Ever since the signing of executive order 13514 by President Obama, US federal departments and agencies have been mandated to make their buildings and operations as eco-friendly as possible. While various department plans are being drafted, the greatest example of this environmental commitment is in the NASA Ames Sustainability Base.

What is the NASA Ames Sustainability Base?

The Ames Sustainability Base is NASA’s latest addition to the Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley. The idea for the facility began in 2007 when NASA launched their “Renovation by Replacement” campaign to upgrade their worksite conditions for the humans inside and the environment outside. Among the 60 federal facilities that are up for LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) certification, the Ames Sustainability Base is one of the very few businesses to earn the platinum certification.

What Makes the Ames Sustainability Base Different?

The reason the Ames Sustainability Base is a technological marvel is because NASA has taken their design philosophy for space missions and applied it to architecture. The high energy needs of the facility are greatly supported by green technologies, including on-site solar panels, geothermal wells, and a non-combustion Bloom Energy box.

Water reclamation is an important feature for NASA space missions, but it can also be used to great effect down here on Earth. By filtering water from toilets and urinals, NASA plans to cut down on water consumption by 90% and use the reclaimed water for local irrigation.

When it comes to the structure of the facility, many of the materials and pieces of furniture are made with recycled materials, including metals and wood from prior NASA projects.

Environmental technology is also present in the landscape around the building, primarily through the use of stone bioswales that filter pollution out of the earth.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard-working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA online or at (877) 810-7473.

The Benefits of Building Information Modeling (BIM)

December 29th, 2018 Posted by Architecture, Environment, Green Construction No Comment yet

Between architects, engineers, and construction companies (AEC), the process of erecting a building is filled with opportunities for miscommunication, mismeasuring, and misfortune. Luckily for those in the field of construction, technology has now caught up to meet their needs with one incredibly useful tool: BIM.

What is BIM?

Building Information Modeling (BIM) is an exciting opportunity for AEC businesses across the globe that are planning new construction projects. The goal of BIM is to take data from architects and engineers and produce a thorough representation of the structure that will be referenced throughout the development process.

Benefits of BIM

While physical blueprints are always vulnerable to human error and miscommunication between architect and building crews, BIM provides a 3D model that provides an in-depth analysis of the structure’s functionality, as well as constant contact between all parties involved in its development. If any user changes the designs to better fit their needs, the changes are also applied to all views for all parties.

BIM isn’t just useful as a producer of structure models and project plans, it also delivers key information for ongoing maintenance of the building. Maintenance data displayed by BIM includes heatmaps for tracking energy distribution in buildings as well as areas of high pressure where future repairs may be needed.

BIM vs. CAD

Computer Aided Design (CAD) does work when drafting basic home structures, but is incredibly limited due to its lack of parameters. BIM possesses a vast catalogue of supplies and building materials, creating a true-to-life depiction of your project and presenting the practical effect of your choices and plans. Unlike CAD, BIM is also used for civil and road engineering as well as urban infrastructure design.

With the new developments taking place in South Los Angeles, there has never been a better time for AEC companies to join the construction revolution. Call us today at (877) 810-7473 or visit us online to find out how BIM technologies can work for you.

Ironworkers helped the Wilshire Grand Center set a world record during its construction

Ironworkers Were Instrumental in Helping the Wilshire Grand Center

December 1st, 2017 Posted by Architecture, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

Ironworkers Were Instrumental in Helping the Wilshire Grand Center Make its Mark on Los Angeles

The accolades & critical acclaim for downtown LA’s new 73 story Wilshire Grand Center wouldn’t have been possible without the work of thousands of people in varying trades. However, ironworkers from helped the 1,100 ft. structure not just rise taller than anything else in the city – and taller than anything west of the Mississippi River for that matter – but set a world record doing so!

Turner Construction Company sought to claim the record for the largest continuous concrete pour, amounting to 21,200 cubic yards altogether. To do so, approximately 7 million pounds of reinforcing steel was expertly placed and tied by ironworkers. Over the course of six weeks, these hardworking individuals readied the site so the pour attempt could take place. Finally, on Saturday, February 15, 2014, concrete began flowing into 18-foot-deep rebar and… Record accomplished!

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

 

Photo: http://happeningindtla.com/wilshire-grand-tower-explored/

Ironworkers Allowed America’s Skylines to Soar

Ironworkers Allowed America’s Skylines to Soar

November 17th, 2017 Posted by Architecture No Comment yet

For almost all of human history, stone & wood were the most commonly used building materials. Understandably, these materials were plentiful and highly workable. Although iron has been utilized for a millennia, it wasn’t until the dawn of the Industrial Revolution that iron’s true usefulness became realized, and America’s skylines began to soar.

Early ironworkers experienced immensely exciting, albeit dangerous, work as the nation built itself skyward. With perhaps a scant decade of service possible due to job hazards, these “cowboys in the sky” helped transform our nation into the industrialized juggernaut that further cemented our reputation as the “land of opportunity”.

The inherent risks of this burgeoning profession led to the formation of the International Association of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers of America on February 4, 1896. Sixteen delegates founded the union in Pittsburgh in order to establish protections and rights for their hard work, a tradition which continues today.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium features an innovative, retractable roof design

Atlanta’s Newly Completed Mercedes-Benz Stadium Promises to Impress

October 27th, 2017 Posted by Architecture No Comment yet

Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium features an innovative, retractable roof design.

Large-capacity stadiums capable of seating over 70,000 crazed fans is nothing new as most major metropolitan areas have professional sports franchises warranting the construction of such facilities. For the most part, these stadiums are of a roofless design, leaving players and fans vulnerable to the elements. For some, that’s merely part of the experience, but there are an overwhelming majority of people who, for good reason, don’t want to get wet, freeze, or sweat after spending $500 between a pair of seats and concessions… Go figure!

The Atlanta Falcons (NFL) and Atlanta United (MLS) will share the newly constructed Mercedes-Benz Stadium. Designed by HOK, it features many unique design elements, including an eight panel retractable roof inspired by the Roman Pantheon. Resembling a pinwheel, it was designed to open or close in just 12 minutes, allowing fans to enjoy much more than just the game, regardless of weather.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

photo © Penn State University Libraries Architecture and Landscape Architecture Library | CC BY-NC 2.0 (see information), via Flickr

What Was The First Steel Frame House Built In The United States

October 20th, 2017 Posted by Architecture No Comment yet

The Lovell House… Truly Ahead of its Time!

Upon first approaching the (deceptively) simple looking structure built into the side of a cliff in Los Feliz, it looks like any number of buildings constructed after 1980. Its steel frame, concrete walls, and casement windows could easily pass for any random professional building dotting the modern landscape… But this one’s different.architect-Richard-Neutra

First, it’s not a professional building. It was built in 1929 as a private residence for Dr. Phillip Lovell and his family; henceforth known as the Lovell House. Designed by architect Richard Neutra, it represents an early example of the International Style design language. Furthermore Lovell House stands out as one of the most important homes of the 20th century because it was the first steel frame house built in the United States. This method of construction is typically reserved for skyscrapers, but Neutra learned the necessary techniques while working with the firm Holabird & Roche in Chicago.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

 

photo: photo © Penn State University Libraries Architecture and Landscape Architecture Library | CC BY-NC 2.0, via Flickr

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Gothic Architecture Building Techniques

October 6th, 2017 Posted by Architecture No Comment yet

‘Going Goth’ is Helping Buildings Become Stronger and Lighter

Gothic architecture has long been defined by the churches and cathedrals created during this changeful period in human history. While distinct details define this style, its many revolutionary building techniques are being reexamined today.

After researching the construction of historic Gothic structures, the Department of Architecture at ETH Zurich in Switzerland discovered that the Roman-origin building technique uses subtle arches to span spaces while flying buttresses serve as reinforcements for the exterior walls of many structures.

Since construction techniques used in the Gothic era differ greatly relative to techniques utilized today, researchers at ETH propose creating flooring similar to those used in the Gothic era. Something resembling a honeycomb pattern of solid areas with voids would allow the flooring to be poured without requiring additional reinforcements.

The Gothic-based honeycomb method is 70% lighter than modern equivalents, all the while saving space, being environmentally-friendly, and proving more cost effective.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

 

picture: http://www.skyscrapercity.com

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The Capitol Records Building. A Los Angeles Landmark For Over 60 Years

September 15th, 2017 Posted by Architecture, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

Vinyl Never Went Out of Style!

Although completely obliterated by aliens or natural disasters in no less than three major Hollywood productions, the Capitol Records Building, located just north of the world famous intersection of Hollywood and Vine, has proven to be a well-loved (and wholly unscathed) fixture of the Los Angeles skyline for over 60 years.

Designed by Welton Becket – who also penned the rather mundane department store that wouldWelton Becket architect later become the stunning Petersen Automotive Museum – this 13-story structure opened in 1956 and holds the distinct honor of being the world’s first circular office building. Given Capitol Records standing as one of the most recognizable names in music, such a design philosophy makes sense… The floors are (supposedly) meant to resemble a stack of vinyl records. The coolest feature of the building, however, may be its steeple; it features a red light that continually blinks H-O-L-L-Y-W-O-O-D in morse code… Perhaps that’s what attracted the aliens!

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

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Highest building in world Burj-Khalifa-Dubai

Burj Khalifa in Dubai, UAE, Tallest Building In The World

August 2nd, 2017 Posted by Architecture, Environmental News No Comment yet

Burj Khalifa. There’s Tall, and Then There’s TALL!

Peter Ellis revolutionized the world when he created Liverpool’s Oriel Chambers (1864), the first building to utilize an iron frame and glass “curtain walls”. This served as the genesis for the world’s first true skyscraper, Chicago’s 138 ft. tall Home Insurance Building (1885). It’s steel frame allowed for superior load-bearing capabilities while advancements in materials like concrete and glass allowed for more flexible construction techniques and applications. Such methodology became the default construction “recipe” for all skyscrapers since, including the world’s tallest…

The colossal 2717 ft. tall Burj Khalifa in Dubai, UAE.

Utterly dwarfing the 1250 ft. tall Empire State Building by almost a 2:1 margin and holding no less than seven world records, including: tallest building, tallest freestanding structure, highest number of stories, and highest outdoor observation deck, the Burj Khalifa is a triumphant testament to human design, engineering, and construction that stands above all until someone goes higher!

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

*image from Getty

La Sagrada Familia Basilica in Barcelona

La Sagrada Familia Basilica in Barcelona

July 21st, 2017 Posted by Architecture No Comment yet

La Sagrada Familia Basilica in Barcelona is expected to take approximately 144 years to complete

The Project of a Lifetime (or Two)…

In this day and age of advanced manufacturing techniques, it’s hard to imagine any sort of construction project taking over a decade to complete. Yet, La Sagrada Familia Basilica in Barcelona, Spain is serving as a testament to the adage, “you can’t rush perfection” because this cathedral was begun in 1882 and is still under construction today with an anticipated completion date around 2026!

Architect Antoni Gaudi (1852-1926) was renowned for an eclectic style which drew upon the Arts and Crafts movement, Symbolism, Expressionism, and Rationalism in addition to many of the forms & techniques of 20th-century Modernism.Architect Antoni Gaudi

Gaudi’s unique talent attracted the attention of wealthy families in Barcelona at the time who commissioned him to design lavish homes and other buildings in order to promote the city as a viable tourist destination… And it worked! The basilica, although 75% complete, draws millions of visitors from around the globe each year!

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

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