Posts in Los Angeles Construction Projects

Help Make Every Day Earth Day!

April 20th, 2016 Posted by Environmental News, Green Construction, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

The modern environmental movement began on April 22, 1970 thanks to the efforts of a Wisconsin senator named Gaylord Nelson. For on that day, Sen. Nelson proposed that Americans throughout the country be given a voice to speak out against the seemingly unchecked environmental damage being inflicted upon the nation’s natural resources as a result of rampant industrialization and population growth. Over 20 million people responded, garnering the attention of other members of Congress who, up to that point, had largely ignored Sen. Nelson’s pleas for environmental action.

That day became known as Earth Day.

Earth Day has since provided countless people around the world with the inspiration to become advocates for the planet. Indeed, one of Earth Day’s most endearing outcomes in the 45+ years since its origin has been that we can all make a difference, no matter how insignificant that action may seem, because every little bit helps.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

Building Earthquake-Resistant Structures

April 17th, 2016 Posted by City Planners in Los Angeles, Environment, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

The earthquake, however, must be to every one a most impressive event: the earth, considered from our earliest childhood as the type of solidity, has oscillated like a thin crust beneath our feet; and in seeing the labored works of man in a moment overthrown, we feel the insignificance of his boasted power. – Charles Darwin

Humanity’s efforts have been damaged or destroyed by earthquakes for as long as we have been building structures. However, ingenuity and determination (along with a lot of science & math) have helped modern societies develop earthquake-resistant structures. Two primary goals when designing such structures is to minimize the loss of life (by preventing collapse) and minimizing the loss of functionality within the building.

The techniques applied to the earthquake-resistant design of a structure can vary greatly and can include:

  • Using bendable/lightweight materials
  • Structural dampers (shock absorbers)
  • Base isolators (via bearings or cushions)
  • Shear walls (braced panels that counter lateral loads)

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

Why Our Carbon Footprint Matters

January 29th, 2016 Posted by Enviroment, Environmental News, Green Construction, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

Much focus has been given in the last decade about the need for citizens of developed countries to reduce the carbon footprint of their citizens in order to meet CO2 emission goals that climatology experts believe will mitigate the damage of anthropogenic (human-caused) climate change.

What Are Carbon Footprints?

Carbon footprint refers to the total amount of CO2 directly & indirectly produced by humans as a result of our daily activities, expressed in units of tons per year. These activities include everything we commonly do in modern society: driving, flying, using computers/other electronics, and the production of electricity. But many people are also shocked to learn that carbon footprint is also impacted by activities we rarely consider such as producing beef or making plastic bottles.

There are many calculators available to help homeowners and businesses track their carbon footprint allowing us all to see how small changes in our lifestyle today can have a big impact on tomorrow.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

Creed LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

Solar Power Is More Popular Than Ever

January 26th, 2016 Posted by Enviroment, Environmental News, Green Construction, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

By now, most Americans have become familiar with those ubiquitous objects being placed on countless rooftops & utility poles around the country. Called photovoltaic solar panels (PV), these units use sunlight to create electricity through the use of a semiconductor such as silicon.

As with many technologies we now take for granted, PV’s were too expensive to be a commercially viable way of generating renewable energy shortly after their creation in the 1950’s. Widespread use by the aerospace industry and the military helped the manufacture of such materials become more economical, thus making them increasingly affordable for businesses and homeowners alike to capitalize upon.

Today, continued development has made photovoltaics more efficient and economical than ever.

Panels continue to cross the 20% efficiency threshold while delivering power for well under $0.70 per watt. With the Sun expected to last another 5 billion years, solar power will remain popular for quite some time!

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

Creed LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

open space central park

Why Open Space Matters

January 4th, 2016 Posted by City Planners in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux made history in 1858 by winning a design competition meant to establish the first major, landscaped, public park in the United States. This 750 acre facility, located at the center of Manhattan Island, would go on to become the most famous and recognizable public park in the world… Central Park. Although it was conceived and built over 150 years ago, the open space and diverse greenery the park offers created a template used countless times since as a means of offering respite from the hustle and bustle of the cities that surround them. As a result, parks provide numerous health benefits for their visitors on both a physical & psychological level, in addition to helping the surrounding environment. These positive attributes can be applied to all open spaces, or green areas, throughout cities around the country, including those right here in Los Angeles, and underscore the importance of open space preservation everywhere.

Studies have shown that open space / green areas within urban environments have the following positive effects on those who visit them:

  • Improved personal health by promoting visitors to partake in various physical activities, such as walking, biking, and jogging.
  • Reduced stress levels and lower reports of clinical depression by offering visitors calm, serene areas that exist in contrast to the hectic pace of the city itself.

Furthermore, the physical environment directly benefits from these areas in the following ways:

  • By providing a habitat for native flora and fauna to thrive, despite overwhelming human development.
  • Help to reduce the “heat island effect” caused by buildings, roads, and other types of infrastructure.
  • Help regulate local microclimates and water cycles, especially runoff.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well. Creed LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

 

love canal aerial view

Lessons Learned From Love Canal

December 21st, 2015 Posted by Green Construction, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

The tragedy of Love Canal is so incredulous that most people cannot comprehend how such a disaster was allowed to occur. Yet, it is important to note the problem started well before 1970, the year of the first Earth Day, which means the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), along with many important laws and policies, had not yet existed. Environmental awareness wasn’t part of the average American’s psyche back then.

Love Canal is the name of a post-war, working-class neighborhood built adjacent to a defunct canal project branching off the Niagara River in upstate NY. Located just a few miles from Niagara Falls, it was supposed to become a model community representing modern living. Instead, it became one of the worst environmental disasters in the nation’s history. The Hooker Chemical Company had used the partially dug canal as a chemical waste dump from 1942-1953, amounting to almost 21,000 tons of toxic chemicals, including approximately a dozen known carcinogens, eventually leaching into the basements and yards of homes in the area. To make matters worse, the Niagara Falls School Board decided to build a school directly above the canal. Although they were warned of potential hazards by the chemical company, the school board persisted, even signing off on a release form that was supposed to prevent any legal action against the Hooker Chemical Company in the future. The land itself was bought for just $1.

Unfortunately, a series of illnesses began to afflict residents in the late 1970’s due to the nature of the chemicals buried in the ground. These included asthma, epilepsy, migraines, and nephrosis (kidney disease), along with abnormally high rates of birth defects and miscarriages. News of this tragedy began to build momentum thanks to local activists, which culminated in 1978 when President Carter declared the area a federal health emergency and ordered the government to relocate all affected families.

This action represented the first time in American history that emergency funds were used for something other than natural disasters.

Love Canal also set the stage for the Environmental Justice movement, which the EPA defines as:

“…the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies… It will be achieved when everyone enjoys the same degree of protection from environmental and health hazards and equal access to the decision-making process to have a healthy environment in which to live, learn, and work.”

This philosophy is of particular interest to us at the Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA). Given the wide range of individuals that work on Los Angeles’ construction projects, it is not uncommon for matters that affect the quality of life for on-site workers, along with residents within the local community, to arise. If not managed properly, construction activities can be major sources of air, water, soil, noise, and light pollution, all of which negatively impact the environment.

Creed LA proudly supports environmentally-responsible projects in Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

We fight to ensure that developers pay fair wages to the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans, regardless of race, religion, or socioeconomic status. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact Jeff Modrzejewski at (877) 810-7473.

 

Image licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 License.

Rana Plaza

Why Creed LA Fights For Fairness

December 3rd, 2015 Posted by City Planners in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development Fights For Fairness

The world watched & read with horror that fateful day in April, 2013. On that day, over 1100 people lost their lives when Rana Plaza, a shoddily built garment factory outside the city of Dhaka, Bangladesh, collapsed as a result of substandard materials, workmanship, and lackadaisical building codes. Over 42 people have since been brought up on charges of varying degrees, including murder, for what has become known as the “deadliest garment factory accident in history”. The gross amount of negligence and oversight that resulted in these fatalities was completely unnecessary.

We’d like to think that no such calamity could ever happen here in the United States.

Indeed, we confidently walk into public and private buildings alike without ever considering the “what ifs” that led to a disaster like Rana Plaza. A large part of this confidence and security comes from knowing that all facets of the construction process are completed through the adherence to strict standards and regulations, all thanks to the expertise of architects, engineers, inspectors, and especially, local labor unions. These proud organizations represent the best of the electrical, plumbing, and mechanical trades and include the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW), United Association (UA), and SMART. Together, they form the backbone of America, and it is precisely through the efforts of these hardworking, highly trained, and highly skilled Americans that we don’t have disasters like Rana Plaza.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to the hard working men and women throughout the construction trades while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. As a result, CREED LA proudly supports exceptional construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only positively impact the local community, but support LA’s working families in the process.

To learn more about how our non-profit organization fights for fairness, contact Jeff Modrzejewski at (877) 810-7473.

 

Photo Source: Inhabitat.com/tag/bangladesh

LA Skyscrapers

Help Counteract the Effects of Urban Heat Islands

December 3rd, 2015 Posted by City Planners in Los Angeles, Green Construction, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

What Are Urban Heat Islands

Urban heat islands (UHI) are a consequence of our modern, developed societies. The term describes the phenomena whereby built-up urban areas are 2–5°F hotter than nearby rural areas. This results from the construction of buildings, roads, and other forms of infrastructure on areas where trees and other vegetation once stood. The types (non-porous) and colors (dark) of popular construction materials contribute to this issue because they absorb and retain more heat, and for longer periods of time, than natural materials. Therefore, urban heat islands adversely affect local communities and the environment in a number of ways, including:

  • Increased summertime peak electrical energy demand
  • Increased amounts of air pollution
  • Increased greenhouse gas emissions
  • Greater occurrence of heat-related illnesses and mortality
  • Decreased water quality
  • Altered local weather patterns

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized this growing problem a number of years ago and has a webpage dedicated solely to UHI. The intent is to educate and empower the public about what can be done to mitigate this entirely anthropogenic issue. In particular, they outline five strategies, listed below, that could be enacted to reduce heat gain due to urbanization:

  • Planting trees and other vegetative cover
  • Installing green roofs
  • Installing cool roofs
  • Utilizing cool pavements for roadways
  • Smart growth and development programs

hirilogo1_1

Local community organizations spearhead many of the grassroots efforts to replant trees and other forms of vegetation to UHI-affected cities. However, larger projects, such as the engineering and construction of a green roof on top of an existing structure, must be undertaken by properly trained & highly skilled construction professionals.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to the hard working men & women throughout the construction trades while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. As a result, CREED LA proudly supports environmentally-responsible projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better world for us all, contact Jeff Modrzejewski at (877) 810-7473.

 

suburbia

Los Angeles Green Construction Projects

November 19th, 2015 Posted by Green Construction, Los Angeles Construction Projects, Los Angeles Suburbs No Comment yet

Suburbia is Dead – Long Live Suburbia!

Suburbia. Its origins date back to the Victorian era of the 19th Century, a time in which some towns outside of London’s city limits began to blend into its borders. This was a new concept in human civilization because other large cities in Europe at the time, notably Paris, still had farmland or wilderness surrounding it before the next town began. In the United States, suburbs began on the east coast and spread westward as the nation grew over time. However, most Americans consider the post-war growth of the 1950’s and beyond to signify the true developmental period of the modern suburb.

In recent years, our view of the suburbs began to evolve as the environmental movement gained supporters outside the scientific community. Today, a majority of everyday citizens understand terms like sustainability and carbon footprint. These individuals know that “energy efficient” and “eco-conscious” are no longer marketing buzzwords; instead, they represent an expectation for how buildings are supposed to be designed and built. Additionally, they are eager to support construction projects in Los Angeles that feature and promote green building techniques and equipment.

Even as the Los Angeles suburbs forge new paths thanks to this age of environmental enlightenment, it’s important to remember that highly-skilled, highly-trained construction workers are needed to safely and competently build these projects.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to the hard working men and women throughout the construction trades while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. As a result, CREED LA proudly supports green construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only positively impact the local community, but support LA’s working families in the process. To learn more about how our non-profit organization fights for fairness, contact Jeff Modrzejewski at (877) 810-7473.

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