The Eiffel Tower Remains A Global Treasure And Engineering Feat

October 27th, 2016 Posted by Aesthetics And Renovations, Architecture, Environment, Environmental News No Comment yet

The Eiffel Tower… From Reviled Local Eyesore to Revered International Icon

The Eiffel Tower… From Reviled Local Eyesore to Revered International Icon

The Eiffel Tower remains a global treasure and engineering feat 127 years after its completion

Leading up to the Exposition Universelle (World’s Fair), which Paris would be hosting in 1889, event organizers hosted a competition seeking the design of an iron tower on the Champ-de-Mars featuring a square base 125 meters across and 300 meters tall. Maurice Koechlin and Emile Nouguie conceived the initial design we know today back in 1884. Unfortunately, the tower’s design was met with complacency by the person whose very name would be affixed to this global treasure… Alexandre Gustave Eiffel.

A civil engineer, architect, and metals expert who established himself as a highly respected bridge builder, Eiffel had architect Stephen Sauvestre improve the aesthetics of the original design. Happy with what he saw, Eiffel commissioned the project and construction began on January 28, 1887. Two years, two months, and five days later on March 31, 1889, the incomparable Eiffel Tower opened for the world to enjoy.

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To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

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