Posts tagged " environmentally-responsible projects "

Water, Water Everywhere!

January 29th, 2016 Posted by Enviroment, Green Construction No Comment yet

Mankind has known that sea water is undrinkable due to its excessive salinity, but that hasn’t stopped us from trying to find ways to desalt the sea.

Since ancient times, distillation has been utilized to remove salt from the water, making it drinkable. Today, the process of removing salt and other unwanted molecules from seawater is better known as desalination and it typically relies on more advanced and energy efficient methods than distillation alone. Called reverse osmosis, it involves the use of synthetic, semi-permeable membranes in which the pores are only large enough for water molecules to pass through. The water is pressed, under very high pressures, through the membrane, leaving fresh water on one side & a salty brine on the other… Nothing else, including salt molecules, microorganisms, or pollutants pass through! Reverse osmosis is one of the most commercially viable options to bring fresh water to areas of the world that would normally be without.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

Creed LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

open space central park

Why Open Space Matters

January 4th, 2016 Posted by City Planners in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux made history in 1858 by winning a design competition meant to establish the first major, landscaped, public park in the United States. This 750 acre facility, located at the center of Manhattan Island, would go on to become the most famous and recognizable public park in the world… Central Park. Although it was conceived and built over 150 years ago, the open space and diverse greenery the park offers created a template used countless times since as a means of offering respite from the hustle and bustle of the cities that surround them. As a result, parks provide numerous health benefits for their visitors on both a physical & psychological level, in addition to helping the surrounding environment. These positive attributes can be applied to all open spaces, or green areas, throughout cities around the country, including those right here in Los Angeles, and underscore the importance of open space preservation everywhere.

Studies have shown that open space / green areas within urban environments have the following positive effects on those who visit them:

  • Improved personal health by promoting visitors to partake in various physical activities, such as walking, biking, and jogging.
  • Reduced stress levels and lower reports of clinical depression by offering visitors calm, serene areas that exist in contrast to the hectic pace of the city itself.

Furthermore, the physical environment directly benefits from these areas in the following ways:

  • By providing a habitat for native flora and fauna to thrive, despite overwhelming human development.
  • Help to reduce the “heat island effect” caused by buildings, roads, and other types of infrastructure.
  • Help regulate local microclimates and water cycles, especially runoff.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well. Creed LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

 

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Rebuy… Environmentalism Made Easy

December 23rd, 2015 Posted by Environmental News No Comment yet

For over 40 years, the world has heard of the “3 R’s” (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle) when teaching others about environmental consciousness. Indeed, these three little words have had a major impact on how citizens throughout the country view the environment. The underlying concept behind each word is so simple, it’s been taught to elementary school students for years!

Recently, though, a fourth “R” has been added to this mantra: Rebuy.

Like the other three, it’s instantly understandable. In fact, most of us have been doing this for years, although we’ve seen it referred to a variety of different things, based on the origin of the product in question…

  • Post-Consumer content: refers to materials used from products that were once sold and used by consumers or businesses; normally, these products would be discarded as waste.
  • Recyclable products: refers to new products that are (literally) made from recycled materials.
  • Recycled-Content products: refers to products that are made from materials that were recycled; they may or may not have been once saleable products.

reduce reuse recycle rebuy

One of the largest benefits of any form of recycling in the construction industry is the energy savings realized by NOT having to convert raw materials into finished products. Among the most poignant examples is aluminum. Producing aluminum from recycled stock uses only 5% as much energy as would be required if starting with bauxite (ore). The elimination of mining, transportation, and production costs is passed onto the consumer. Thus, purchasing as many products as you can that are made of recycled material (in any of its forms) can help save money and the environment simultaneously!

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) supports and promotes the ideology the “4 R’s” represents, for both the construction industry and ordinary citizens.

We believe in environmentally-responsible projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well. Creed LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans.

To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

 

LEED building

Help Your Next Building Project Take the LEED On Green Building Design!

December 21st, 2015 Posted by Green Construction No Comment yet

Environmental awareness has come to the forefront of the world’s conscious in recent years. An innumerable number of products, services, and initiatives have flooded us with environmentally-friendly options that didn’t exist a decade ago. One area that has seen immense growth is green building or green construction. Referring to the utilization of environmentally responsible building materials and techniques during the design, construction, and use of a facility, a recent report by online trade publication Environmental Leader shows that the field is expected to experience a 13% growth right through 2020.

LEED Is A Green Building Certification

Within the realm of green building, there exists LEED, or Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design. A component of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), LEED is a green building certification program that recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices as it seeks to change the public’s opinion about how buildings and communities are designed, constructed, maintained and operated around the world. This philosophy includes the following environmental and economic benefits as LEED-certified buildings can:

 

  • Save money and resources
  • Promote renewable, clean energy
  • Have a positive impact on the health of its occupants
  • Cost less to operate, reducing energy and water bills by as much as 40%

LEED Is A Green Building Certification

In addition to the reasons stated above, businesses and organizations that earn LEED certification for their building-projects seek to attain such status because it frees up valuable resources which can be used to create new jobs, attract and retain top talent, expand operations, and invest in emerging technologies. This is of particular interest to us at the Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA). We proudly support environmentally-responsible projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well. Creed LA fights to ensure developers pay fair wages to the hard-working construction professionals throughout the industry, while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans.

To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact Jeff Modrzejewski at (877) 810-7473.

LA Skyscrapers

Help Counteract the Effects of Urban Heat Islands

December 3rd, 2015 Posted by City Planners in Los Angeles, Green Construction, Los Angeles Construction Projects No Comment yet

What Are Urban Heat Islands

Urban heat islands (UHI) are a consequence of our modern, developed societies. The term describes the phenomena whereby built-up urban areas are 2–5°F hotter than nearby rural areas. This results from the construction of buildings, roads, and other forms of infrastructure on areas where trees and other vegetation once stood. The types (non-porous) and colors (dark) of popular construction materials contribute to this issue because they absorb and retain more heat, and for longer periods of time, than natural materials. Therefore, urban heat islands adversely affect local communities and the environment in a number of ways, including:

  • Increased summertime peak electrical energy demand
  • Increased amounts of air pollution
  • Increased greenhouse gas emissions
  • Greater occurrence of heat-related illnesses and mortality
  • Decreased water quality
  • Altered local weather patterns

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized this growing problem a number of years ago and has a webpage dedicated solely to UHI. The intent is to educate and empower the public about what can be done to mitigate this entirely anthropogenic issue. In particular, they outline five strategies, listed below, that could be enacted to reduce heat gain due to urbanization:

  • Planting trees and other vegetative cover
  • Installing green roofs
  • Installing cool roofs
  • Utilizing cool pavements for roadways
  • Smart growth and development programs

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Local community organizations spearhead many of the grassroots efforts to replant trees and other forms of vegetation to UHI-affected cities. However, larger projects, such as the engineering and construction of a green roof on top of an existing structure, must be undertaken by properly trained & highly skilled construction professionals.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to the hard working men & women throughout the construction trades while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. As a result, CREED LA proudly supports environmentally-responsible projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better world for us all, contact Jeff Modrzejewski at (877) 810-7473.

 

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