Erie Canal History

The Erie Canal

March 9th, 2017 Posted by Environment, Transit-Oriented Development No Comment yet

Before Planes, Before Trains, there was … the Erie Canal

Connoisseurs of civil engineering projects often credit the Panama Canal as mankind’s pivotal triumph over nature. Yet, an equally ambitious project predated it by almost a century and was done without the aid of gargantuan digging machines. The Erie Canal was commissioned by New York State as a way to help our rapidly expanding nation transport products west of the Appalachian Mountains by connecting Lake Erie with the Hudson River, about 363 miles away.

On July 4, 1817 digging began and continued for eight years, finally opening on October 26, 1825. During that time, 83 locks were constructed to help the 40’ wide, 4’ deep canal cope with 565’ of elevation change along its route. This was aided by 18 aqueducts, some of which passed over rivers & deep ravines… So impressive was this engineering feat at the time that many considered it the Eighth Wonder of the World.

The Coalition for Responsible Equitable Economic Development (CREED LA) proudly supports environmentally-responsible construction projects throughout Los Angeles that not only have a positive impact on the local community, but support LA’s working families as well.

CREED LA fights to ensure that developers pay fair wages to all the hard working construction professionals throughout the industry while simultaneously providing them with quality health care, continued training, and trustworthy retirement plans. To learn more about how our non-profit organization supports those building a better, greener world for us all, contact CREED LA at (877) 810-7473.

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